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Laveen STEM Advocates- adding STEM Programming to Your School through Targeted Community Partnerships

Posted By Linda Coyle, Sunday, October 23, 2016

Are you interested in implementing STEM into your School?

Join the Laveen STEM Advocates on their Journey!

The Laveen STEM Advocates program was initiated by Dr. Joe Roselle, the Director of Grants and Partnerships for the Laveen School District.  Dr. Roselle began this collaborative partnership between 20 schools in eight different districts, all with an interest in implementing STEM programs within their schools.  The schools have committed to meet five times during the school year, each with a goal of developing a targeted, strategic plan for STEM immersion. 

STEM education is an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to learning that provides hands-on and relevant learning experiences for students.  STEM teaching and learning goes beyond the mere transfer of knowledge.  It engages students and equips them with critical thinking, problem solving, creative and collaborative skills, and ultimately establishes connections between the school, work place, community and the global economy.  STEM also helps students understand and apply math and science content, the foundations for success in college and careers.

The 20 schools, supported by Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz), Maricopa County Education Service Agency (MCESA), Grand Canyon University, Rio Salado, the Arizona Business Education Coalition, and the Arizona Department of Education STEM leadership team, began the process by using the STEM Immersion Guide to ascertain their current level of STEM immersion. The Guide developed by SFAz and MCESA describes four levels of immersion from Exploratory, Introductory, Partial Immersion and Full Immersion.  The schools took a self-assessment designed to help target their initial levels.  They will either go deeper into their current level or move up a level.  In addition, each level contains program descriptors in six different categories; Leading, Teaching, Learning, Budgeting, Evaluating and Sustaining.

The schools will each select a site specific Design Team made up of Superintendent (or Assistant Supt.), Parents, Higher Education Member, Students, Geographically Significant Employer, Principal, District Board of Education member, Teacher(s), District Level Finance Employee and Civic Leaders. The Design team works to grow the STEM program organically within the community. Each site will have a different strategic plan based on the mission, vision, goals and objectives of their specific districts. 

In addition to learning strategies for integrating STEM into their schools, the partners will each be provided current professional development opportunities by STEM service providers, an extensive list of resources to business partners, and a collaborative network to share ideas and best practices.

To join this group of dynamic educators contact Dr. Joe Roselle at: jroselle@laveeneld.org


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MENTORS & MENTORING: GIVING VOICE TO STEM

Posted By Linda Coyle, Sunday, October 23, 2016

A Memorable Day in Flagstaff STEM City

Submitted by Dr. Len Fine, October 21 2016

 

Taking note of the historic "Shining City Upon a Hill” farewell address Ronald Reagan delivered at the end of his presidency, Flagstaff, Arizona STEM City leader David Engelthaler provided the basis for a wide-ranging "Mentor and Mentoring: Giving Voice to STEM” event that spanned the afternoon of Friday, September 30th.

The afternoon followed on the heels of a morning "Back-to-School Breakfast” sponsored by 100Kin10 that captured the essence of this national industry network initiative, engaging 200 business/industry partners – 24 in Arizona – engaged actively in adding 100K excellent new teachers to the K-12 STEM workforce. Challenging the Arizona partners were seven grand challenges and their root causes, including the undervaluing of STEM in the general education of students and the professional development of their teachers.

 Joining with the Arizona STEM Network led by Dr. Mary O’Reilly, both events were hosted by Professor Max Dass and the Northern Arizona University (NAU) Center for Science Teaching and Learning (CSTL) that he leads, in their shiny new digs in the Science and Health Building. Thanks, Mary, and Max!  

As Arizona lead partner Freeport McMoRan pointed out, meeting the 100Kin10 goal is a social responsibility and a moral test requiring significant community investment. And that is just what the afternoon program was all about: COMMUNITIES significantly INVESTING IN STEM.

 What Engelthaler took note of in his "view from a STEM City on a Hill” was the community commitment to STEM in Flagstaff – his Shining City - connecting the S (Science) and M (Math) in STEM through the T (Technology) and E (Engineering)… STEM … and the collective impact STEM makes connecting Arizona communities.

Participants in the afternoon were challenged by three community panels, each responsible for framing strategic aspects of STEM – by a government panel, by a STEM education panel, and by a business and industry panel.

The government panel led off with Flagstaff Mayor Jerry Nabours and included Art Babbott, Chair of the Coconino County Board of Supervisors; media representation by Bonnie Stevens, KNAU and Flagstaff Festival of Science; and Rob Thames, CEO, Northern Arizona Healthcare; giving voice to successful community investment strategies from their diverse perspectives.

Linda Coyle, Science Foundation Arizona Director of Education, led the discussion describing the creation of three effective STEM Mentoring communities, in Northern (Flagstaff – Mindy Bell), Central (Phoenix – Jessica Hauer) and Southern (Sierra Vista – Sandee Trevino) Arizona.

Jerry Proctor, Deputy Commandant, US Army Intelligence Corp (ret’d) led a comprehensive discussion between business executives – Ali Applin, SenesTech; Julie Pastrick, Flagstaff Chamber of Commerce; Steve Pedigo, Northrop Grumman Corporation; and Anne Newland, CEO North Country Healthcare – of STEM and the changing face of the workforce: or, how to train for jobs that didn’t exist a decade ago, and others that don’t yet exist, but soon will.

The challenge is being met. Here is the evidence in stronger, more successful STEM-literate communities being built by refocusing the dialogue between government, education and business and industry partners… in Flagstaff, the shining STEM City… on the mountain.

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Teachers in Industry Updates

Posted By Linda Coyle, Sunday, October 23, 2016

Teachers IN Industry- Partnering with Business to Prepare the Future Workforce

Through a partnership between local business leaders, school advocates, and members of the University of Arizona, we developed a new model of collaboration between industry and education. It is a model for a productive partnership between the industry and classrooms and is effective in its implementation in how educators, school districts, and private industry can work together to benefit all parties in an effort to increase student success and teacher retention.

Teachers in Industry was started in 2009 as a collaboration between the University of Arizona’s College of Education, the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, Tucson Values Teachers, and Raytheon Missile Systems as a way to address the educational crisis in Tucson, Arizona.  Currently, the program has expanded its partnerships to include, teachers and schools across Arizona and more than 40 industry partners. Teachers in Industry offers teachers a combination of paid summer work experiences in Arizona businesses and industries together with intensive university coursework leading to either a Master’s degree with a focus on STEM education or professional development credits. Teachers in Industry addresses two critical issues in Arizona: the crisis of STEM teacher retention in Arizona and the lack of student preparation in K-12 for the STEM workforce. http://teachersinindustry.arizona.edu/

Recently, Teachers in Industry fall 2016 graduates presented their culminating projects both in Tucson and at SRP’s Pera Club in Tempe. Throughout our program, teachers reflect upon their practices and goals and consider strategies that will engage all their students in learning these skills along with relevant STEM content.  Teachers base these goals and strategies directly on what they have learned through their summer workplace experiences and learning.  Their culminating project involves nearly a year of work in their classrooms as they gather data, then translate what they have learned about their students and their teaching into a poster and summary document.  These are available on our program website (direct link), http://teachersinindustry.arizona.edu/action-inquiry-projects. For further information see: http://teachersinindustry.arizona.edu/

or contact: Martha W. Ostheimer, Director of Business Development

Teachers in Industry Phone:   (520)621- 5352

ostheime@email.arizona.edu

http://teachersinindustry.arizona.edu
College of Education North 
1501 E Speedway Blvd
Tucson Az 85721


Figure 1: Graduating teachers, program faculty, and business representatives at SRP's Pera Club reception.

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Rio Salado Recruiting STEM Professionals

Posted By Linda Coyle, Wednesday, May 25, 2016
Rio Salado Recruiting STEM Professionals 

The Rio Salado Noyce Scholar Program is recruiting its last cohort of scholars with application deadline being August 1st.  Rio Salado College is particularly interested in targeting professionals displaced, trade affected or retiring workers (Encore careers) in STEM-related industries.  We are looking for individuals who are looking to make an additional impact on society, have a meaningful personal fulfillment experience, and earn an income.
 
The grant will provide a $16,500 stipend for professionals who have a bachelor in the science, engineering, or math. Because the majority of the Teacher Preparation Program is virtual, it allows STEM professionals the flexibility to continue their current pursuits while completing the 12-month teacher preparation coursework.  There will be opportunity for some in-field practicums which entail classroom observations in some of the coursework. At the end of the program the professionals will be required to complete 12-weeks of full-time student teaching (Noyce Scholars will not be allowed to work during the 9-week student teaching experience).  
 
After completing a 12-month teacher certification program, the Noyce Scholar must make a two-year commitment to an Arizona high-need STEM teaching assignment.  Rio Salado College has partnered with a thirty one Title I secondary school districts in the valley and throughout Arizona to provide not only student teaching experiences, but also job placement in math or science, grades 7-12 classrooms.
 
For more information, contact Karen Nave at Karen.Nave@riosalado.edu or call 480-517-8743

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Striking STEM Gold: Scientists in the Classroom

Posted By Linda Coyle, Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Science Foundation Arizona is proud to support Flagstaff STEM City as  a part of our "ENLIST" mentoring grant.  The article below, published by Mandy Bell, highlights the excellent work they are doing to connect students and scientists in the classroom.

 

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Helios Scholars at TGen Graduate from Summer Biomedical Research Training

Posted By Lisa Herrmann, Friday, July 24, 2015

Forty-five students, representing Arizona’s next generation of biomedical research scientists, graduated today from an eight-week biomedical training program at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Sponsored by the Helios Education Foundation, the Helios Scholars at TGen concluded its ninth year today with a daylong scientific symposium, including student poster and oral presentations. Helios Scholars competed at the symposium for awards, recognizing project mastery and presentation skills, and were celebrated for their achievements.

Helios Scholars at TGen is the research institute’s flagship summer internship and research program for Arizona students pursuing careers in bioscience and medicine. Helios Scholars work in TGen’s laboratories — receiving one-on-one mentorship from TGen scientists — as they pursue new discoveries about serious illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease, infectious diseases and many types of cancer.

“We are proud to celebrate the accomplishments of the Helios Scholars at our annual symposium,” said Brandy Wells, TGen Director of Public Affairs and Education. “The event serves not only as a showcase for their individual biomedical research accomplishments, but also demonstrates the huge wealth of talent and drive among Arizona students. TGen scientists prepared them with quality mentorship and training so that they will be able to tackle the biomedical challenges of complex human diseases.”

The program is open to Arizona high school, undergraduate and graduate level students, including those in medical school. This summer’s ninth class of Helios Scholars at TGen were selected from more than 600 applicants. Past interns boast an array of impressive accomplishments, publishing scientific abstracts, scientific articles, and acceptance into medical and graduate schools.

Program applications for the 10th class of Helios Scholars at TGen starts in January 2016 at www.tgen.org/intern.

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Have a Real Impact on Education at National STEM Conference, to be Held in Arizona this January

Posted By Lisa Herrmann, Thursday, June 25, 2015

By definition, STEM fields are always changing and evolving, and understandably, educators are challenged to keep up on the latest trends and innovations. By speaking to educators at the upcoming national conference, 21st Century STEM: Integrate to Innovate, you can provide a window into your STEM career and industry that can be shared with students and teachers across the country.

 

Science Foundation Arizona and the AZ STEM Education Collaborative are proud to partner to bring this ground-breaking national conference to Phoenix on January 21st and 22nd, 2016. Conference participants will engage in diverse sessions to explore and enhance STEM educational practices. Sessions will not only be outstanding learning opportunities for educators, many of them will include how business, informal education, early childhood experiences, and K-16+ classrooms create a nexus of learning that result in the 21st century graduate prepared for tomorrow’s world.

 

To participate on a panel related to STEM professions, please contact Lisa Herrmann, lisa.herrmann@gmail.com. To learn more about the conference, including submission of your own presentation proposal, visit http://arizona-stem-collaborative.org/21centurystem/ and for an opportunity for your STEM business to be recognized nationally as a sponsor of this worthy educational event, visit: http://arizona-stem-collaborative.org/21centurystem/sponsor-time/

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Scottsdale Unified School District Foundation teams with TGen to create Excellence in Bioscience Teacher Initiative

Posted By Lisa Herrmann, Thursday, June 25, 2015
The Scottsdale Unified School District (SUSD) Foundation is teaming with the Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) to create an Excellence in Bioscience Teacher Initiative. Scheduled to take place in July 2015 at TGen, the new pilot program will provide teachers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) with a strong fluency in cutting-edge biomedical research. An intensive, thee-day agenda will immerse them in a series of presentations, interactive discussions and practical experiences led by TGen bio-medical experts.  

“We are pleased to work with the SUSD Foundation to create this educational opportunity for the SUSD,” said TGen President, Dr. Jeffrey Trent.  “TGen recognizes that to fully achieve its mission we must invest in local schools to help build the pipeline of translationally-minded future scientists and physicians that will elevate Arizona in terms of health care and economic competitiveness.”  

“We believe that increasing the content-knowledge, depth of understanding and insight of just one educator can benefit an exponential number of students over time,” said Brandy Wells, TGen Director of Education and Public Affairs, and former junior high school teacher. “TGen’s interest in education and outreach is to help train and inspire Arizona’s next generation of researchers and physicians. Positively impacting teachers has been an ongoing interest area for me personally.  This program represents an opportunity I would have benefited from and sincerely enjoyed as a teacher. We hope this initiative can be used as a model for industry-education partnerships in the future.”

The pilot program was praised by Scottsdale Mayor W.J. “Jim” Lane, who has overseen an expansion of bioscience efforts through the city’s Cure Corridor, a stretch of Shea Boulevard that includes hospitals, clinics and other innovative businesses dedicated to bioscience and medicine. “This new partnership is exciting and potentially powerful,” said Mayor Lane. “Combining cutting-edge research, innovation and technology with education can benefit everyone, particularly the students within the Scottsdale Unified School District.  As a Mayor active within Arizona’s Bioscience industry, I see this as the perfect collaboration.”

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SFAz Draws More than 350 Educators from 13 Arizona Counties to Conference

Posted By Lisa Herrmann, Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Just a week after most Arizona schools closed for summer break, more than 350 dedicated educators from 13 of Arizona’s 15 counties traveled to Tempe to attend the 3rd Annual Arizona STEM Clubs Conference to learn how they could improve their students’ achievements and better prepare them for college and careers through establishment of STEM clubs at their schools.

Science Foundation Arizona and Arizona State University hosted the conference for teachers and administrators to learn how to establish STEM clubs, apply for seed funding for STEM clubs, and attend breakout sessions on topics such as project-based learning, increasing STEM interest among girls and minorities, and STEM and the arts. The Helios Education Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Wells Fargo, IDT and the Herbert H. and Barbara C. Dow Foundation generously sponsored the event. Attendance at the annual Arizona STEM Club Conference has grown from 120 the first year to more than 350 this year.

An SFAz study has shown that students participating in these clubs had higher pass rates for the 2014 AIMS math and science tests in comparison to the state average in all grades. Interest and confidence in STEM studies were also found to be higher in students attending STEM clubs, as compared to their peers in control groups who did not participate.

“The STEM Club Conference provides an amazing array of resources for teachers to integrate STEM into both after school programs and the classroom.  Teachers travel to this event from all over the state to gain practical knowledge, connect to business and industry, and apply for seed funding for clubs at their schools”, said SFAz Director of Education Linda Coyle. “This year’s event highlighted the connections being made between K-12 education, the community, and business and industry. It’s truly inspirational to see how committed the teachers are to helping students reach their highest potential while evolving their interest and motivation into STEM careers.”

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Noyce Scholars

Posted By Lisa Herrmann, Thursday, May 28, 2015

Lindsey Buckles has just completed her first semester of teaching at Bradshaw Mountain Middle School in Humboldt Unified School District, but she’s not your typical new teacher. Initially pursuing a career as an actuarial, Lindsey has now earned her teaching certificate through an online hybrid program at Rio Salado College in Tempe. The Noyce Scholar Program, a National Science Foundation initiative, provides a venue for STEM professionals, those working in science, technology, engineering or math fields, to change careers and become middle or high school math or science teachers.

 

"I'm not meant to be sitting behind a computer all day long. I like helping kids. This is where I feel good and where I feel comfortable," Lindsey explains. Future goals include more schooling as she works toward a master's degree. She highly recommends the online program and said she received extra support through the Rio Salado program administrators.

 

Karen Nave, Noyce Scholars Program manager and assessment coordinator, said each of the 15 scholars receive a $16,500 stipend, which is disbursed in seven payments throughout the 15 month teacher preparation program. For Lindsey’s program, Rio Salado College partnered with HUSD, which offered observation, field experience, and student teaching opportunities, but there are many more districts throughout Arizona with needs for certified teachers. For more details about the Noyce scholarship program, visit www.riosalado.edu/noyce or call 480-517-8066.

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